What is poverty? And does it define us?

This is a question that I get asked often. People ask me if I can define it. In reality  its very difficult to define. There are three definitions of poverty in common usage, those being absolute poverty, relative poverty and social exclusion.

Absolute poverty defined as having the lack of sufficient resources with which to meet basic needs. Relative poverty defines income or resources in relation to the average income. But how does poverty define us?

According to the Joseph Rowntree foundation there are more than a million people living in poverty in the UK. I’m sure that figure is lower than the actual figure due to the level of people finding themselves without work etc rising everyday. They say that 184,5000 households have experienced a level of poverty that has left them with no choice but to resort to charities for essential things and shelter. The Joseph Rowntree foundation also say that three quarters of people living in poverty go without meals and half cant afford to heat their homes. These are some very basic statistics, but how what does living in poverty mean to those living in poverty?

I live in poverty, I’m not ashamed to say it. I don’t think that it has ever left my side except for a very brief moment a long time ago. So I can say this out of experience. I live in an area that is one of the poorest in the country, and a lot of my neighbours live in some kind of poverty.

Poverty can be very restricting and isolating. It defines how you can travel and relate to others.   Socialisation is limited to mainly your local surroundings or your own home. Public transport is expensive and is often off limits. Walking distance is often as far as you can go. So you often only see your local area and your own home, and slowly you begin to isolate yourself. You might  stop talking to people because you feel ashamed that you are poor and you certainly don’t want to be reminded that you are. You avoid people and places, its easier that way because it numbs the pain. This very often starts a cycle of depression and illness, often from a very young age.

The media bombards the public with advertisements and television programmes promoting a richer, happier lifestyle. They also promote the scrounger rhetoric with programmes such as Benefit Street. Discrimination against the poorest in society has never been this bad. Names such as scrounger, fraudster, single parent, immigrant are thrown everywhere with such hatred and disgust. I see this a lot whist helping claimants, no one bothers to ask what their story is, they are given a label.

When you live in poverty debt becomes your worst enemy. High rents, the bedroom tax, council tax, sanctions, benefit delays, low wages all ensure this. Charity shops become your best friend that’s if you can afford them. Food and heating becomes a priority, often its a choice either heating or eating. Its a tough choice because both are equally important.

Poverty defines your every move, children grow up knowing no different but the gap becomes clearer the older they get. They will soon be growing up to accept name calling and discrimination, after all the media have done an extremely good job of turning neighbour against neighbour. People cant just snap out of it and find a job that doesn’t exist.

Everyday I’m reminded of the film Cathy come home. I have a daughter who lives with her partner and children in a privately rented house. The house is very damp, it floods all the time, but the landlord refuses to help. She cant move because she cant afford to pay the £1000 deposit upfront, she doesn’t have a guarantor and she owes rent from her previous sub standard flat which was a housing association flat. She manages, keeps the damp to a liveable level. She lives in relative poverty.  She says that she is lucky to have a home, and she is right, but no one should have to live like this. Sadly its not unusual, its commonplace but it shouldn’t be.

People are trying to get by, its not easy and the unemployed and the working are stuck in the same situation. I say that we will soon be back to the 1930s poverty levels, but I fear that it will be more like 19th century poverty levels. Poverty does indeed define us, we might try to deny this, but it has defined my life and it will continue to do so.

I urge the public to use compassion and kindness instead of hatred and discrimination. After all this can happen to anyone and everyone is three pay slips away from being in the same position.


 

 

 

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20 thoughts on “What is poverty? And does it define us?

  1. Reblogged this on The Night Owl and commented:
    I had to reblog this, as it speaks to me with avoice from my childhood, where destitution could be one payslip away.
    I remember, as a child, knowing that there was nothing to spare, where clothes from charities, and jumble sales, were the norm for us all. Where Mum scrimped and saved for necessities, and forget about luxuries – and where she often went without food for herself, to make sure that we children had at least one hot meal a day, even if it meant she didn’t eat it herself – and this was a household where my Dad worked all the hours he could to make ends meet!

    This post, along with so many others I’ve been reading recently, are an inditement against the recent changes made both by New Labour, and the Conservatives, in the way in which they treat those people reduced to a state of poverty, through their deliberate, neoliberal, policies 😦

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    1. I already write for the morning star I too write feature articles. My name is Charlotte Hughes if you Google Charlotte Hughes morning star you’ll find my articles I’ve submitted this to the newspaper in the hope of publication I’m also an nuj journalist

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      1. Ah, just as I sent that message, my brain was whirring ‘Charlotte Hughes’? know that name! Read your articles – and found them very thought-provoking. Good to meet another MS journo!

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  2. A friend was tellng me that in the 1950’s she would often come home from school and mum would say ‘I’ve had my tea’ as she fed her children. It was only later in life that my friend realised her mother had gone hungry. As I go through life now I meet more and more people like this – people who can’t afford a cup of tea in a cafe, people who buy cheap food that is low in nutritional value but it’s their only option. I meet people who’s only conversation is about ‘how I’m going to manage to get through the week’ or ‘what the heck am I going to do if the baillifs comes round’. These people aren’t wasters or lazy. They’re good, decent people on hard times. We all know who the ‘scroungers’ are in this country and it isn’t those at the bottom of the pile.

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