Today’s demo. Frustration, food parcels and anger. 

I was a bit anxious about the demo this morning for two reasons. The first being the weather, it looked like the heavens were about to open and Odin was about to pour all his wrath upon us. Secondly, it’s the school holidays and I have to bring my daughter with me. She’s normally very good, but is an active, intelligent girl that can easily become fed up. 

My fears were unfounded though, because the sun shone, it was warm and my daughter was kept busy thanks to my friend Karl and my friend Lel. My friends are wonderful thank you. 


As I arrived so did the food parcels. it wasn’t a long wait, and Roy dropped them off. He’s amazing. He used to work for Citizens Advice amongst other organisations and is now retired, although I don’t think that he has much spare time! 

I had noticed a lady that we hadn’t seen for a few weeks waiting across the way for a food parcel. I had been worried about her, but she assured me that she was ok. She took a food parcel and I double checked that she is getting all the advice and support locally that she needs. She said that she was, but she’s very quiet and isn’t too happy taking to new people. I will try and help her with this though. 
I spoke to a man that said that he needed a food parcel. He said that he was on the verge of becoming homeless and was caught up in a mess that he feels that he can’t see a way out of. He would only speak to me, and as well as offer him a food parcel, I asked him to go straight to a local drop in to see if he can get some extra support and help. He told me that he would, but I’m not sure if he did. I can only try my best to help people to engage. 
I spoke to a lady who is struggling with her Universal Credit payments. She’s waiting for her first payment to arrive and they keep changing dates and payment amounts. The poor woman doesn’t know if she is coming or going. They have told her that she will most likely receive her money in two weeks time, but two weeks without money can seem like a lifetime especially when you have children. She’s also having trouble with her child benefit payments. 

She is getting advice from our local Citizens advice Bureau, but I also signposted her to another local organisation. I really hope that she went to see them, but once again, I can’t force anyone. If they don’t know them they might not trust them. The whole DWP system makes them feel this way. 

As I was handing leaflets out and advising people, two men dressed very smartly walked towards the doors of the Jobcentre. I asked them if they were from any agency etc, and they replied that they wern’t but they investigate fraud cases. 

It was then that I recognised one of these men. I had taken a lady for an appointment at the Jobcentre under the guise of checking that she was recieving the correct benefits. When we were sat at the table I noticed that on the top of his letter, it said fraud in big letters. Of course I immediately questioned this because I knew that without a doubt that this lady had never committed any kind of benefit fraud, or crime in her life. I asked him about why she was there for fraud when her letter said a benefit check. I also asked him for any evidence of any so called fraud. Of course he couldn’t answer me, he went on to say that he would do a benefit check, which he did and she was claiming everything that she was entitled to. I knew this of course. 

Watch out for this folks, this is how they can catch you out, especially innocent vulnerable people. Always take a witness with you to any such meetings and make a full record of the conversation, either written of verbally recorded also. Don’t let them catch you out. I’ve seen too many peoples lives destroyed in this way. 

On their way out of the building he looked at me and gave me a glare, which was ok, because I was already glaring at him.

We also handed food parcels out to people that don’t want to be mentioned, but their struggle was real. They are very brave in the shadow of adversity and are the true heroes of this world. 
Towards the end of our demo a lady walked up to a colleague shouting at him. We had never seen her before. She was an elderly lady who was very obviously fed up with the system. She went on to rant about scroungers etc etc. Whilst I cannot sympathise with the words that she spoke, I can understand why she is angry. 

The town that we live in has been run down so much it was unrecognisable to a 70yr old man that we spoke to today. He had just returned back to England from South Africa where he had lived for many years. He told us that he didn’t recognise the place. It’s awful he said, no wonder young people have no hope. They’ve got nothing to look forward to, no chance of a decent job, no chance of anything. He said when an area looks run down and uncared for so do the people living there. I totally agree with this. 
The government has systematically destroyed communities, are not supporting people adequately in their time of need and cut a person’s lifeline off when they decide to sanction them. 

We can’t as a country carry on like this for much longer, something will have to give way, and the government realises this. 

When it’s time to vote folks, use your vote wisely. I can’t stress how important that this is. 


A massive thank you to everyone that managed to join us today. It was a very slow start, but I’m so happy that you all arrived. Thank you so much. 

Thanks to my daughter for taking the photos. She’s fab. 

Please share and talk about this blog as much as possible. A lot of people still have no idea of what life is like for people having to endure signing on and claiming any type of benefit. It’s heartbreaking having to share these stories every week, and often we return home upset and frustrated. 

Also please donate if you can. Every penny helps thank you! 
http://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=K47PHPHS5XYRC” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow noopener noreferrer”>

Blackberry Crumble. Frugal and almost free to make! 

it’s that time of the year again, time to harvest the free fruit that grows around us. 

Blackberries grow almost everywhere, even in urban areas and they are a delight that we should all take advantage of. 

They are high in vitamins, and if you can’t afford to buy fruit and vegetables from a supermarket or shop, you can pick these for free. 

Children love eating these whilst picking and my daughter always eats more than we take home. 

There are lots of things that can be made from Blackberries. Jam, Cake, Crumble, Wine, Cordial. The list goes on and on. 

Yesterday, because the sun was shining for a change and I’m skint and didn’t have anything sweet at home, we decided that we would go Blackberry picking and make some Blackberry crumble when we returned home. 

This is how I make it, everyone has their own tastes and therefore the recipe can be adjusted to suit yours. My reciepe is very basic. 


It’s important to wash your Blackberries after picking and to soak them in a very diluted solution of salt and water. This helps any bugs and debris  that might be lurking to float to the top. I’ve never come across any bugs, but I keep up the tradition of doing this. Call me old fashioned, but if it was good enough for my grandparents to do then I will follow suit. 


After soaking place in a dish of your choice. It doesn’t have to be a fancy one. The one that I use is an old lasagne one left over from the days when I could afford to cook lasagne. You can use any dish that’s suitable for the oven. 


Once in the dish, sprinkle with normal granulated sugar to taste. If you have a sweet tooth add more, if not add less. I also added Cinnamon mainly because we like the taste and for the various health properties that it has. 


Time to make the topping. 

My daughter and put as much flour as we thought would be needed to cover the top in a bowl. Yes, we played it by eye. We like a lot of topping and I’m really bad at using exact measurements. 

I grated enough cold butter to mix and bind the four together so it resembles sand once finished. Again we used guesswork and I’m hopeless with measurements. 

I also added some sugar and cinnamon. Just enough to make it nice and sweet. 


My daughter then placed the topping on top of the Blackberries. She likes to make a pattern on the top. She’s ten years old and it’s a good sensory activity for her. This did take her some time to perfect her pattern!


Ready to put in the oven. 

I placed it in the oven at gas mark 5, 375f and 191c. 

I watched it and took it out when it looked ready. It really wasn’t in the oven long therefore not using much energy up. 


The finished creation. 

This can be ate on its own, with custard (the packet custard is really good with this), and if you can afford it it can be ate with cream and Icecream also. 

To make this a vegan dish just replace the butter with a vegan equivalent. 

Happy eating! And don’t forget to look out for the blackberries. 

I’m harvesting some cherries from a friends cherry tree today, and will also be harvesting some Sloe berries to make some christmas presents with. 

Free food given to us by nature is the best food! Enjoy! 

Today’s blog. Stress, suffering and yet more rain. 

I can understand if you are fed up of my complaining, but this is what it is like, week in, week out. Nearly four years later and after much complaining myself and my colleagues are still here, helping people. It’s a travesty that we still need to isn’t it. 
I arrived at Ashton jobcentre mid phone call. I was talking to a colleague. As usual there were people waiting for help, although it was a bit slower than usual. The DWP has a habit of changing a claimants time to sign on, just to frustrate them I think. They like to disrupt a persons routine as much as possible and to make things difficult. I’m certain that this is done to keep people on their toes, and is a constant reminder that big brother is always watching them. 

Remember, once a person is caught up in the system their life isn’t their own anymore. Their every action, thought and very being belongs to the DWP. To comply is the most important thing, and even when they give a claimant a wrongful claimant commitment they are too scared to question it. The mantra must be repeated, “I must comply, I must comply”. If they don’t they stand a good chance of loosing everything. Their health, sanity, self respect, family and their home.

 Rarely is a case straight forward to deal with because the system isn’t straightforward. It’s purposely designed to be complicated and to make people suffer. Sometimes I think that the government would like them to disappear, well everyone that isn’t of any use to them in any way. They are quick to ensure that claimants have to undergo their awful work programme and workfare (work for nothing) schemes. They profit highly from these, and so do the directors of these companies and businesses. 

Today was particularly awful for a lady and her partner that we have been helping and giving support to. They had finally, after months of waiting been allowed to claim Universal Credit that they were entitled to. Having a baby recently had complicated things, and although signposted they like to speak to us because we are trained to help, and they also trust us. Trust is a massive issue, more than you would think. The DWP sucks any trust that a person had in anyone away, so we build this trust up. And I’m proud of the work that we do. 

I saw them dash into the Jobcentre, I knew that this wasn’t their regular signing on day and they looked very rushed and stressed, so I asked them what was wrong? Could we help them in any way? 

Their problem wasn’t caused by them, the very flawed Universal Credit system had taken them off the system without their knowledge and the Jobcentre staff were far from helpful. The system does this sometimes and when it does it’s devastating. When your only source of income is taken away, your lifeline it’s the worst thing that can happen. After some advice, she went back into the building and they actually let her use a telephone to phone the Universal Credit system up and to sort it out. 

Common sense would say that an ‘advisor’ should do this for them, but like my readers will know, the DWP aren’t known for their common sense and compassion, but at least she was allowed to use a telephone. I’m sure that our presence helped with this. 

After a long telephone call, she was told that their claim will be started as a new one and they will have to wait for their first payment. It’s just not good enough. She has children to feed. But huzzah they advised her that she can get a ‘loan’ off them whilst their claim is waiting to be processed. A loan that has to be taken back upon her first payments and concurrent ones. They decide the rate. She has no choice to accept. As a result her payments will ensure that she will be forced to live on much less than she should be doing. It’s a trap that most Universal Credit claimants fall into out of necessity. 

We spoke to a WASPI lady, a 60yr old lady that has been told that she has to take part in the work programme. This lady is 60 years old, but looks much older. she’s worked all her life and has been reduced to having to do this. We sympathised with her, because there’s not a lot else that we can do. The DWP show no respect for age like we do. But she was very glad to see a friendly face. 

We spoke to a homeless chap, who is managing to get by. He has no substance or alcohol abuse issues, and as a result he keeps away from situations and places where there are these issues. I did signpost him to local organisations, but it’s up to him if he goes to these places. Some deal with the issues that he wants to steer clear of so it’s difficult for him. We can’t force anyone to engage with a certain organisation and nor should we. We get to know people, gain their trust and then maybe they can be persuaded to do so. But whatever decision that they make we will be there for them, because like I’ve said not one persons situation is straight forward, its usually complicated and we understand that. 

We spoke to a young lady who is also a carer for her mother. We had seen her briefly last week as she wheeled her mum into the Jobcentre. Once again we asked if they were ok, their response was that they wern’t ok. The young ladies advisor had told her that she has to look for full time work, even though she is a full time carer. We gave her the correct information and advice regarding this and they entered the Jobcentre. 

Thankfully they wern’t in too long. they had taken our advice and had seen a much nicer ‘advisor’ this time. Believe me some advisors can be more vindictive than others. Most likely because they are target driven. 

They left with a smile, some good advice and a food parcel because they are struggling. This isn’t because they aren’t claiming everything that they can claim, it’s because people simply aren’t given enough to live on. 

I spoke to a man who is sanctioned and who has a relative living with him who’s had failed his ESA medical. . I do signpost him every week, but he has trouble engaging with some organisations. He trusts us, Good news though, he will hopefully be receiving his first payment next week, and I’m so happy that he is. 

Today he was too scared to stand in front of the Jobcentre, he didn’t want to be seen and we get a lot of people that are like this. They feel that the DWP are watching them all the time and they aren’t wrong are they. 
We spoke to many people with many different issues. We have received training to help people through this awful system, and we have also had years of experience doing this. In my spare time I also check for legislation changes and converse with other groups such as DPAC who are a tremendous moral support to myself. 
We do signpost people, this isn’t as easy as people think. Like I’ve said before lots of people targeted by the Jobcentre find it hard to trust anybody, and certain situations can trigger anxiety etc. 

I spoke to a man leaving the Jobcentre who told me that he was from a work programme provider. I explained that I know exactly how these places are ran and what it’s like for the people forced to attend. I couldn’t let this opportunity slip, so I asked him what their employment rates are. How many actually gain decent employment after attending. He couldn’t really answer, which was no surprise because its all about the money not the person isn’t it. 
We were joined today by the gang from The Wigan pier project, this is a project ran in conjunction with the Daily Mirror, and is being done to highlight the similarities between George Orwell’s book The Road To Wigan Pier and modern times. The similarities are astounding and it was lovely to meet them. They showed great comapssion and understanding and I’m sure that their story will be really good. 
Tomorrow is the start of the summer holidays in my area and as you will have read in the newspapers, more children than ever will be going hungry. It’s abhorrent that the government quite happily ensures that children will be hungry. I’m expecting the demand on our help could well be higher, but we will be there for them. 
I was donated a kindle fire, that was donated to me  to a jobseeker to make their job searching easier. It’s not easy having to sit in Libaries and other suchlike places using their computers to do this. Having a bit of independence to complete their job searches on their own is a massive tool to empowerment. That is if they know exactly what their requirements are. I gave the kindle to D for himself and his mother to use. It will free their life up a bit, and they can now go to a cafe, or even Ikea to do this. 

Good news though! Pat a very talented member of our team has made a fantastic new banner for our four year anniversary which is coming up in the first week of September. It’s amazing and it will catch peoples attention. I will post details about this nearer the time. 

I need to apologise to the team for my rather stressed mood today. The summer holidays are looming and every now and then i feel like I’m getting nowhere quickly. Thank goodness that the campaign is going well though and that’s thanks to everyone that supports and reads my blog. Thank you all so much. 
I couldn’t take any photos today again I was far too busy. I’m going to really try next week, and I apologise. But this is a cracker isn’t it. Yes they’ve made a massive difference to the life chances of people throughout the country haven’t they… their life chances have been evaporated. 

I’ll end it on this note. A young man who had been made homeless today due to thoughtless and inconsiderate rulings made by a local social housing provider said this. ” I went in for help, they didn’t give me any. I went to housing options, they looked at me like I was a piece of rubbish, just like the Jobcentre did. I was given a piece of paper and that’s it. no one wanted to listen to me, they both just wanted rid of me. It’s wrong, I’m not a criminal, and now I’m homeless” 

This man was referred to a local homeless charity, but we did show him compassion and understanding and a food parcel to keep him going whilst he sorts everything out.

 I had to stop him and ask him what had happened though, rarely does anyone voluntarily come out with this information straight away. People feel ashamed, and they might think that no one else cares. But we do and we will always care. A lot of my time is spent asking people if they are ok, and also at times running after people who are in an angry state. I’ve mentioned this in a previous blog post. 
Keep safe out there folks, I’m thinking of you all. 

Big shoutouts to Kate Belgrave, Keith Ordinary Guy, DPAC, Unite Community, and everyone who reads and shares this blog. 

Please  donate help keep the blog and campaign going if you can. If not please share. It’s important that we keep talking about this all the time. This has become a full time job for myself, and anyone spending any time with me will attest to that.

 Thank you!

http://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=K47PHPHS5XYRC” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow noopener noreferrer”>… 

Today’s demo. Food parcels taken immediately, anger, frustration and a visit from a French film maker. 

To say that today’s demo was busy is an understatement. It was both hectic and stressful. We also got a fair bit of verbal abuse from passers by.  Today was one of those days. 
As soon as I arrived I met the lovely man who is making a film about the awful DWP system in the UK. We had a quick discussion about what he was wanting to do. He also explained to me that the French government might be thinking of implementing a similar system. Awful. He’s against this. 
Gordon was taking the food parcels out of his car boot. As soon as he took them out they were all taken. We had none left at 10.05…. This says a lot to me. A stark reminder that far too many people are suffering. 

As soon as they had been taken a man arrived asking for a food parcel. They had all gone so I gave Gordon some money and he took him to the shop next door. Thank you Gordon. 

Then two more people arrived asking for food parcels. We had none and I was panicking slightly when I saw a member of the team, Pat arrive. She buys food from the cheap shop next door when she is able to come. Thank goodness for her because these people were able to have food. 

The need was greater than ever today.  The government and this cruel system have taken the very soul out of the people from my local town. No wonder it’s run down. Lack of funding from the government and lack of money for the basics ensures that the community suffers greatly and it breaks my heart. 
As we were talking to each other, a man stood across the way started shouting abuse at us for no reason at all. I understand his anger, he might have thought that we worked for the DWP or something. However he didn’t give us a chance to explain. I hope that he’s OK and that he’s getting the support that he needs. No one should be driven to feel that amount of anger. 
We spoke to a lovely man who has £4.50 to last him for two weeks. He took a food parcel from us last week and he was given another this week. 

He’s a lovely, polite man who had worked all his life. Seeing him in this state is awful though. His confidence has gone, he can’t wash his clothes and is struggling to keep going. He told us that we are his lifeline at the moment. We regard him as a friend. 
We spoke to a lady who had attempted to go in the Jobcentre and support her friend for her first interview with her advisor. She was wrongfully told that she wasnt allowed to do this, so we informed her friend of her right to do so. 

It might appear petty, but the breaking of these rules by the DWP sets the standard of how the claimant will be treated by that advisor. If they are aware that a person is not aware of their legal rights regarding Job searches etc then they will run roughshod over them. My advice to anyone having to make a claim is to research your legal rights and stand firm. 
Too many WASPI ladies were having to use the Jobcentre today. This always upsets me. The government has basically conned them out of their right to a decent retirement and pension. 
We had a person in a car drive past shouting “Get a job”…. As if we haven’t heard that before. Funny how they don’t get out of their cars and say it, they shout it and dive away at speed. 
I spoke to a lovely chap that I had helped in the past. He was looking much better and he wanted to say thank you. It was lovely seeing him. 
A lovely man started talking to us about the awful treatment that he had received from Ashton Under Lyne Jobcentre and the DWP.  He was very vocal about it, good on him. He is in between jobs and only wanted to ask one question. He was refused that. This is how petty the Jobcentre is. 

He also went on to tell the film maker how awful it is inside the building and how the security guards are, as he described ‘like the Gestapo’. He’s not wrong there. 

He told us that his partner lives in London and her payment had been stopped for no apparent reason. She hasn’t received a letter which is usual. She’s got children, so the children might not be able to eat this week. It’s beyond disgusting. 

We gave him a leaflet which has a number for the Greater Manchester Law Centre. He is phoning them to get the details of local organisations in London that can help her. They are very pro-active there, and so is this man. 
We spoke to a man who sadly is in the belief that he will get his Esa for life. I hope that he does, but the chances of that aren’t high. 
Almost everyone that had to use the Jobcentre were rushing, looking at the ground on misery. This is what the system does to you. It stresses you out and wears you down. It literally never ends. 
Today was stressful, lots of different issues were brought to light. It’s hard work, and anyone that has attended our demos will attest to that. 
Before the demo started I bought a tent for a homeless chap that I buy a coffee for every day. His tent had been destroyed by someone and the local organisations had none. I hope that he is safe tonight. 
As for myself, I haven’t stopped and I apologise for the extra blogs. 

Please spare a thought for each and every person forced to endure this cruel system. And while Ian Duncan Smith still states that the film I, Daniel Blake is a work of fiction, I can say that it is not. The reality is even worse than the film. One day I will tell him so. 

Please share my blog, talk about it, tell your friends. Thank you
There’s also a donate button below. This has become a full time job for myself and every penny counts. Thank you so much.

http://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=K47PHPHS5XYRC” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow noopener noreferrer”>.

Also a MASSIVE thank you to all the team for being amazing and really going out of your way to help people. You are all fantastic. 

Thank you oncw again. 

Exclusion and life below the poverty line. 

Hi folks, I’m writing an extra blog in response to feedback given to me on my Facebook page and Twitter account. I put out the question ‘Would anyone like an extra blog per week, something a bit different to the posts about the demos’. The response was unanimous. A big yes, if I have the time so here it is. 
One subject that I am constantly reminded about is exclusion.

 I know that this will also be familiar to my readers also, but at times it can be blatantly obvious, and at other times not so obvious. 

Before I start writing further, I should explain my position to anyone that isn’t aware. I have no magic money tree, I’m just like you, like millions of people living in the uk. 

I’m a single parent, I live way below the poverty line and have had first hand experience of the DWP system and illness. LIfe isn’t easy for most of us, but I’m not complaining even though I should complain more. I have a wonderful daughter and amazing friends. At times I must try their patience. 
Exclusion comes in many forms, and anyone living in poverty wether it be relative poverty or absolute poverty will experience this, although the severity of it does differ. To put it bluntly the less money that you have, the less you can do. 

I hear friends talk about trips out, I’m sure that you do too, it’s lovely to hear about their adventures, but a the same time it serves as a reminder that apart from local free days out in reality its not an option. 
The  other week I had to pay for a school trip for my daughter. Parents will be familiar with this scenario. The children are excited about the prospect of a day out with their friends, whilst we go into a state of dread and panic worrying about how we are going to pay for this. Many children don’t go, their parents keep them at home. And the school system punishes the child for having time off school. They won’t get their 100% attendance award, a punishment on top of their missed day out. 
As an adult being poor also excludes you from trips to the nearest biggest town, clothes shopping, doing what I call ‘big shops’ yes, Peter Kay is correct in stating that we say these things. I also say ‘big light’. I’m a northern lass and proud of it. Bus fare in my area is very expensive, so the only option is to walk unless you are lucky enough to have a bike. 
Trips to the Cinema, or ‘Pictures’ as I still call it are totally out of the question, going out for a drink is also and having a meal in a restaurant is the stuff of dreams. And yes we do dream about being able to do these things. 
A trip to the Supermarket, if it’s in walking distance becomes an obstacle course in itself. For many people, especially those living in rural areas, there isn’t any choice in where they shop. So they time it for when the yellow stickers go on the food. Believe me it can be a challenge trying to get the bargains that have been reduced, but when you do you hold onto them like they are gold, afterall they can keep a family from hunger for the week. 

It’s not just about material things though, although they do matter. Alongside this comes the loneliness, the isolation and the knowledge that you are ‘different’ than others around you. Taking part in something positive to do can stop a person from spiriling down into the depths of depression. But we just have to accept that we can’t do these things even though we would like to. And small things do matter. 
Friends become fewer, opportunities become fewer and health often becomes worse. 

With a poor diet, illness often accompanies it. It’s no surprise that there has been a return of victorian illnesses such as Rickets in children because children just don’t get access to a varied diet, and the sunlight that’s needed to prevent this. 

Adults and children have to deal with illnesses such as depression, anemia, insomnia, hypothermia, malnutrition, anxiety and many more besides. Whilst the government is busy selling off the NHS to the likes of Richard Branson, the demand is getting higher. We won’t be able to afford medical insurance it’s not an option. 


Why am I writing this you may ask? Everyone must know all this? The reality is, no not everyone does know this. The Tory Party is aware of this but choose for their selfish reasons to ignore it and make it purposely worse. There’s no use in asking for them to be sympathetic. They re created this cruelty in a very conscious way. 

I’m writing this to raise awareness, for people to be a little more understanding of each other. 

The next time a child’s parent’s can’t pay a school trip, don’t criticise and moan about it, instead understand the reasons why they can’t pay. No parent actually wants to exclude them from a school trip, and if a child gets a subsidised place, good on them, don’t hold it against that child or parent. It takes a lot to admit to a school that they can’t afford to pay for a school trip. 

If a child arrives at school in a less than pristine uniform show compassion instead of criticism. Ask the school if they can start a school uniform clothes bank. Some schools already have these. 

If a friend can’t join you for a night out, or a trip to the cinema, don’t show off about it in front of them, nor should you talk about them behind their backs. Instead ask them how they are feeling and be a good friend. 

If a person is hungry show them where the nearest food bank is, or offer compassion. Compassion costs nothing. If you can buy them a sandwich then that might just make them feel human again. Giving someone hope will also do this. 

People shouldn’t be tossed aside because they supposedly dont ‘fit in’. Everyone is important, and so are their right to a decent standard of living. 

More and more people are excluded from housing, vulnerable people left on the streets to beg whilst low funded organisations try and help them, try to keep them safe and feed them. The government has completely absolved themselves from any responsibility, nor do they care about how many people die as a result. 
People are made to feel worthless, subhuman and unimportant by the DWP system of sanctioning and failed medicals which are still being conducted by the likes of Atos. People are dying everyday as a result, but the government just shrug their shoulders and look the other way. 

A WASPI lady committed suicide after the general election because she felt stressed, unworthy and unwanted. Isolated at a time when she should have been enjoying her retirement. Once again the government don’t care. 
On Friday I had to travel to Manchester, something that I don’t do as regularly as I used to. I had to use the public loos and I started a conversation with two young homeless women. They were lovely women, bright, bubbly and friendly. They told me about their life on the streets, and the difficulties they face every day. Both told me that they had been begging all morning and hadn’t got any money, they needed a pound so I gave it to them. They also needed a hairbrush so I gave them mine. I got hugs from them, and smiles that I haven’t seen for a long time. I couldn’t change their situation, but a little bit of kindness gave them hope that people do care. And thats all it takes sometimes. 
In an ideal world we would have a society that wouldn’t exclude anyone, where everyone would have a home, money in their pocket, food and have the support that they need. It’s called socialism and this country is crying out for it. 

http://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=K47PHPHS5XYRC” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow noopener noreferrer”>.

Thursday’s weekly demo. The poor are not responsible for their own poverty.

As usual we held our weekly demo. It was well attended by people from the local area, all with the common belief that it is wrong to make people suffer in the way that the DWP do. The claimants are not to blame for their poverty, its very easy to fall upon hard times, but extremely hard to climb out of poverty. Every attempt is thwarted with yet another obstacle given to them by the DWP.

Its started to become cold now and therefore it gets harder for the claimants and ourselves. Heat or eat is a choice that has to be made and eat usually becomes the only option, that’s if they can afford to. I’m sure that many claimants and working poor claiming Universal Credit have sleepless nights worrying about how they are going to feed their families and themselves. I know that feeling well. It’s a horrible feeling and the government has no right whatsoever to punish the poor for their own poverty, whilst they languish in comfort, it’s a totally different world.

I spoke to a lady who was sent outside the Jobcentre for being ten minutes early. Now before anyone says that this happens all the time, I know it does, Ive been writing about it for two years now. But it always reminds me of the mind games that the DWP like to play. They like to keep control, a bit like an abusive partner. I know that there is room for the claimants to wait, but the G4S security guards turn them away. I inform claimants that they should wait in the lobby but most are too scared to do so. Claimants are terrified of the DWP and with good reason. The DWP in effect controls their life, where their next meal will come from and basically everything that they do.

I also noticed a few claimants runnning towards the Jobcentre, scared of being late. Your cannot be even five or ten minutes late. That will most likely result in a sanction which will take away most of their income. The DWP give no allowances at all, compassion is a quality that they are devoid of.

A woman rushed into the Jobcentre, she was very upset and panicking. “They’ve stopped my money, it wasn’t in the bank. I don’t know what I’m going to do.” She went on to say that she hadn’t received any notification either. This isn’t unusual, and I’m sure its not done by mistake. Call me a cynic but mistakes like this don’t continually occur fo three years. Everything is calculated carefully to ensure that a claimant remembers their place, so they are compliant, so they don’t argue back. A compliant society is very easy to manipulate and they count on that.

I would also like to say that claimants are not living the life of luxury. Anyone that believes this should spend a morning with us. They would be shocked.

We helped countless people. I say countless because I don’t keep a tally but maybe I should. We also spoke and gave advice to claimants whom we see on a regular basis. The Jobcentre staff tell them to ignore our advice, but our advice is correct and empowers people to fight back, to take a stand. And it works.

We handed out some warm coats, but we are needing to start stocking up for winter.

The campaign doesn’t end on a Thursday though. It’s a full time job, and anyone else campaigning like this will tell you the same. Its very hard work, both physically and emotionally. You’ve got to be very strong to undertake it and keep it up. Please donate if you can, it really helps. If you can’t then please share! Thank you!

xclick&hosted_button_id=K47PHPHS5XYRC” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>.

Next Thursday we will be holding a special I, Daniel Blake demonstration to coincide with the official release of the film. Its a fantastic, hard hitting film which touches on some of the issues that we deal with. Please come along if you can. Thursday 10-12. It’s going to be fab..

Also please support my Thunderclap timed to go out on the day that the film I, Daniel Blake is released. Let’s make it massive! That would be amazing! I\
If everyone who read this blog signed up it would take over Twitter for the day!
https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/47840-i-daniel-blake

I also apologise with the delay of writing my blog this week. My health hasn’t been brill and I’m now on antibiotics. I will be feeling bettter soon thanks to our precious NHS.

What is poverty? And does it define us?

This is a question that I get asked often. People ask me if I can define it. In reality  its very difficult to define. There are three definitions of poverty in common usage, those being absolute poverty, relative poverty and social exclusion.

Absolute poverty defined as having the lack of sufficient resources with which to meet basic needs. Relative poverty defines income or resources in relation to the average income. But how does poverty define us?

According to the Joseph Rowntree foundation there are more than a million people living in poverty in the UK. I’m sure that figure is lower than the actual figure due to the level of people finding themselves without work etc rising everyday. They say that 184,5000 households have experienced a level of poverty that has left them with no choice but to resort to charities for essential things and shelter. The Joseph Rowntree foundation also say that three quarters of people living in poverty go without meals and half cant afford to heat their homes. These are some very basic statistics, but how what does living in poverty mean to those living in poverty?

I live in poverty, I’m not ashamed to say it. I don’t think that it has ever left my side except for a very brief moment a long time ago. So I can say this out of experience. I live in an area that is one of the poorest in the country, and a lot of my neighbours live in some kind of poverty.

Poverty can be very restricting and isolating. It defines how you can travel and relate to others.   Socialisation is limited to mainly your local surroundings or your own home. Public transport is expensive and is often off limits. Walking distance is often as far as you can go. So you often only see your local area and your own home, and slowly you begin to isolate yourself. You might  stop talking to people because you feel ashamed that you are poor and you certainly don’t want to be reminded that you are. You avoid people and places, its easier that way because it numbs the pain. This very often starts a cycle of depression and illness, often from a very young age.

The media bombards the public with advertisements and television programmes promoting a richer, happier lifestyle. They also promote the scrounger rhetoric with programmes such as Benefit Street. Discrimination against the poorest in society has never been this bad. Names such as scrounger, fraudster, single parent, immigrant are thrown everywhere with such hatred and disgust. I see this a lot whist helping claimants, no one bothers to ask what their story is, they are given a label.

When you live in poverty debt becomes your worst enemy. High rents, the bedroom tax, council tax, sanctions, benefit delays, low wages all ensure this. Charity shops become your best friend that’s if you can afford them. Food and heating becomes a priority, often its a choice either heating or eating. Its a tough choice because both are equally important.

Poverty defines your every move, children grow up knowing no different but the gap becomes clearer the older they get. They will soon be growing up to accept name calling and discrimination, after all the media have done an extremely good job of turning neighbour against neighbour. People cant just snap out of it and find a job that doesn’t exist.

Everyday I’m reminded of the film Cathy come home. I have a daughter who lives with her partner and children in a privately rented house. The house is very damp, it floods all the time, but the landlord refuses to help. She cant move because she cant afford to pay the £1000 deposit upfront, she doesn’t have a guarantor and she owes rent from her previous sub standard flat which was a housing association flat. She manages, keeps the damp to a liveable level. She lives in relative poverty.  She says that she is lucky to have a home, and she is right, but no one should have to live like this. Sadly its not unusual, its commonplace but it shouldn’t be.

People are trying to get by, its not easy and the unemployed and the working are stuck in the same situation. I say that we will soon be back to the 1930s poverty levels, but I fear that it will be more like 19th century poverty levels. Poverty does indeed define us, we might try to deny this, but it has defined my life and it will continue to do so.

I urge the public to use compassion and kindness instead of hatred and discrimination. After all this can happen to anyone and everyone is three pay slips away from being in the same position.